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NZ central bank cuts rates by 50 bps: Uses cartoons from Rugby to communicate (wish it was cricket)

Summary:
I had blogged about how NZ central bank is using cartoons to communicate its decisions to public. In the recent mon pol decision, it cut policy rates by 50 bps to 1%. It used cartoons from its national sport rugby to communicate. The entire dashboard is as simple as it can get. But one so wishes pictures were from cricket. What a match and what display by NZ. Can’t still get over it. And yes Happy Bday to Kane Williamson! Advertisements This entry was posted on August 8, 2019 at 4:56 pm and is filed under Central Banks / Monetary Policy. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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I had blogged about how NZ central bank is using cartoons to communicate its decisions to public.

In the recent mon pol decision, it cut policy rates by 50 bps to 1%. It used cartoons from its national sport rugby to communicate. The entire dashboard is as simple as it can get.

But one so wishes pictures were from cricket. What a match and what display by NZ. Can’t still get over it. And yes Happy Bday to Kane Williamson!

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Amol Agrawal
I am currently pursuing my PhD in economics. I have work-ex of nearly 10 years with most of those years spent figuring economic research in Mumbai’s financial sector.

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