Tuesday , April 20 2021
Home / Amol Agrawal: Mostly Economics / Surviving a Mass Shooting

Surviving a Mass Shooting

Summary:
Prashant Bharadwaj, Manudeep Bhuller, Katrine V. Løken & Mirjam Wentzel in this paper: We use data on all middle and high school-aged children who survived a mass shooting incident on July 22, 2011 in Utøya, Norway, to understand how such events affect survivors, their families, and their peers. Using a difference-in-differences design to compare survivors to a matched control group, we find that in the short run children who survive have substantially lower GPA (nearly 0.5 SD), increased health visits, and more mental health diagnoses (nearly 400% increase). In the medium run, survivors have fewer years of schooling completed and lower labor force participation. Parents and siblings of survivors are also impacted, experiencing substantial increases in doctor visits and mental

Topics:
Amol Agrawal considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Amol Agrawal writes Inflation in the aftermath of wars and pandemics: Evidence since 1300s

Amol Agrawal writes How well does New Zealand’s financial system serve the Maori community?

Amol Agrawal writes Report on the public consultation on a digital euro

Amol Agrawal writes Real interest rates and demographic developments across generations: A panel-data analysis over two centuries

Prashant Bharadwaj, Manudeep Bhuller, Katrine V. Løken & Mirjam Wentzel in this paper:

We use data on all middle and high school-aged children who survived a mass shooting incident on July 22, 2011 in Utøya, Norway, to understand how such events affect survivors, their families, and their peers.

Using a difference-in-differences design to compare survivors to a matched control group, we find that in the short run children who survive have substantially lower GPA (nearly 0.5 SD), increased health visits, and more mental health diagnoses (nearly 400% increase). In the medium run, survivors have fewer years of schooling completed and lower labor force participation.

Parents and siblings of survivors are also impacted, experiencing substantial increases in doctor visits and mental health diagnoses. However, there appear to be limited impacts on school-aged peers of survivors. While this event affected the entire country, we show that survivors and their families bear significant costs despite robust social safety nets and universal access to healthcare.

Amol Agrawal
I am currently pursuing my PhD in economics. I have work-ex of nearly 10 years with most of those years spent figuring economic research in Mumbai’s financial sector.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *