Friday , June 18 2021
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Amol Agrawal: Mostly Economics

Mostly Economics is an India focussed economics research blog run by Amol Agrawal. He covers a wide range of economic topics while frequently updating his audience on the Indian economy.

Specialization in Banking

Kristian S. Blickle, Cecilia Parlatore, and Anthony Saunders in this NY Fed paper: Using highly detailed data on the loan portfolios of large U.S. banks, we document that these banks “specialize” by concentrating their lending disproportionately into one industry. This specialization improves a bank’s industry-specific knowledge and allows it to offer generous loan terms to borrowers, especially to firms with access to alternate sources of funding and during periods of greater nonbank...

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Capitalism after COVID: conversations with 21 economists

Luis Garicano in this voxeu piece points to this new edited book by him – Capitalism after COVID: Conversations with 21 Economists. The book emerged after discussions with leading economists: While developed countries experienced an unprecedented economic shock between March 2020 and the spring of 2021, none of them suffered a financial crisis, nor did their citizens have to endure widespread poverty or their firms have to go through waves of bankruptcies. The bulk of the shock was...

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A macroeconomic view of the shape of India’s sovereign yield curve

Michael Debabrata Patra, Harendra Behera and Joice John in this RBI Bulletin article look at one of the contentious issue facing Indian economy: steep yield curve. The sovereign yield curve has a special significance for monetary policy in influencing a wide array of interest rates in the economy. Explicitly integrating macroeconomic variables with latent factors of the yield curve in a dynamic factor model, the results reveal that the level of the yield curve has undergone a downward...

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Swedish school lunch reform, nutrition, and lifetime income

Petter Lundborg and Dan-Olof Rooth in this voxeu research: School meal policies differ significantly between countries. Sweden and Finland serve healthy school lunches free of charge to all students, for instance, while children in neighbouring Norway and Denmark bring their own packed lunches from home. This column a programme that introduced free nutritious school lunches for all pupils in Swedish primary schools between 1959 and 1969, and finds that children who participated during...

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From BNP Paribas Archives: History of BNPA Paribas in India since 1860

EABH Podcast features Marie Laperdrix, Head of Archives and History at BNP Paribas. Marie informs about how the French Bank has been steadily building and digitizing BNP Paribas archives. BNP Paribas group has emerged after a series of a mergers. The Comptoir d’Escompte de Paris merged with Banque Nationale pour le Commerce et l’Industrie (BNCI) in 1966 to become Banque Nationale de Paris (BNP). In 2000, BNP merged with Paribas to become BNP Paribas. The digital archives are really...

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When should policymakers reach for the history books? Some examples from the 20th century

Catherine Schenk in BankUnderground blog: Since the Great Financial Crisis started in 2007 there has been renewed interest in using the past as a basis for policy responses in the present, but how useful is history and how is it best used? Certainly, the old chestnut that ‘those who neglect the past are sure to repeat it’ is a valid warning, but how to select the appropriate historical examples and draw the right lessons is a more nuanced exercise that is explored in this post....

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10 questions and answers about the distributional effects of monetary policy

Björn Andersson, Mikael Apel and Iida Häkkinen Skans of Riksbank (Sweden central bank) in this paper look at 10 questions around distributional aspects of mon pol: Income disparities have remained roughly unchanged since 2015, but have increased in the longer term. The increased income disparities are due to the incomes of those who are not working having increased much less than wage incomes, while capital incomes have increased significantly for those with the highest incomes. The...

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CBDCs beyond borders: Allowing tourists to use CBDC?

Raphael Auer, Codruta Boar, Giulio Cornelli, Jon Frost, Henry Holden and Andreas Wehrli in this BIS survey: Central bank digital currencies (CBDCs) could ease current frictions in cross-border payments – and particularly so if central banks factor an international dimension into CBDC design from the outset. Based on a survey of 50 central banks in the first quarter of 2021, this paper explores initial thinking on the cross-border use of CBDCs. While most central banks have yet to take a...

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Saas, bahu, and ASHA: Information diffusion in rural Bihar

Mousumi Dutta, Saswata Ghosh,  Zakir Husain in this Ideas4India article: India has made significant progress in improving maternal and child health outcomes, and the contribution of ASHAs – female community health workers – in promoting healthcare-seeking behaviour is widely acknowledged. In this context, Dutta et al. discuss findings from their study in rural Bihar and highlight two key issues: mothers-in-laws acting as mediators in the interaction between ASHAs and women of...

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100 years of Chinese Communist Party: The Party is not forever

Chinese Communist Party or CCP completes its 100 years in July 2021. Minxin Pei in this Proj Synd piece cautions the party: As the Communist Party of China prepares to mark its centennial on July 1, the poor longevity record of other dictatorial parties in modern times should give its leaders cause for worry. If the CPC is not on the right track with its neo-Maoist revival, its upcoming milestone maybe its last. This entry was...

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