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ECB releases progress on gender targets

Summary:
Executive Board decides to step up efforts to enhance gender diversityECB reiterates aim to double share of women in management from 2013 to 2019The European Central Bank (ECB) today publishes the latest statistics on its progress in increasing the share of women in management positions. The ECB introduced gender targets in 2013 with the aim of raising the share of women in management positions to 35% by 2019.As of the end of 2017, 27% of management positions were held by women compared with an interim target of 29%. For the most senior management roles the share was 17% against an interim target of 24%.Because of this shortfall, the Executive Board of the ECB has decided to take additional measures to improve gender diversity. It also decided that, in addition to the existing targets, the

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  • Executive Board decides to step up efforts to enhance gender diversity
  • ECB reiterates aim to double share of women in management from 2013 to 2019

The European Central Bank (ECB) today publishes the latest statistics on its progress in increasing the share of women in management positions. The ECB introduced gender targets in 2013 with the aim of raising the share of women in management positions to 35% by 2019.

As of the end of 2017, 27% of management positions were held by women compared with an interim target of 29%. For the most senior management roles the share was 17% against an interim target of 24%.

Because of this shortfall, the Executive Board of the ECB has decided to take additional measures to improve gender diversity. It also decided that, in addition to the existing targets, the ECB should have at least one woman in each of its business areas’ senior management teams and that at least one third of the wider management team in each business area should be female.

As part of the new measures, the ECB will adjust its recruitment procedures to attract more female candidates for its job openings. This means, for example, a stronger involvement of headhunters with a mandate to search in particular for women candidates and the need for recruiting managers to explain what was done to find suitable female candidates. If a given vacancy does not attract sufficient female candidates it could be stopped and relaunched. More women from across the ECB will also participate in recruitment panels to counter potential biases and ensure more gender-balanced decision-making. Furthermore, all managers will take part in training courses that focus on inclusiveness.

For media queries, please contact Rocío González, tel.: +49 69 1344 6451

Notes:

The ECB is organised in 25 business areas, which consist of divisions and sections. There are also other working structures that run in parallel, such as committees, which are used when cross-organisational contributions are needed.

At the end of December 2017, the share of women in middle management (Heads of Division, Deputy Heads of Division, Heads of Section, Senior Advisers and Advisers – pay grades I-J) and senior management (Directors General, Deputy Directors General, Directors and Principal Advisers – pay grades K-L) was 27%, while women held 17% of senior management positions. This compares with interim targets of 29% and 24%, respectively.

The Executive Board of the ECB decided in 2013 that by the end of 2019, 35% of all management positions (pay grades I-L, K-L) should be held by women. For senior management positions taken alone the target is 28%.

European Central Bank
Since 1 January 1999 the European Central Bank (ECB) has been responsible for conducting monetary policy for the euro area - the world’s largest economy after the United States.

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