Thursday , April 2 2020
Home / FRED / Central banking since 1701 : Three centuries of Bank of England asset data

Central banking since 1701 : Three centuries of Bank of England asset data

Summary:
[embedded content] The British have a history of recording excellent historical data, and we’ve already written a few related posts. Today we look at central bank assets for the Bank of England, founded in 1694. The graph above shows the assets as a share of GDP since 1701, which is a remarkable timeline, especially because it requires estimates of GDP from before the American Revolutionary War not to mention the Battle of Culloden! This FRED graph shows us that assets in the 18th century reached a fifth of GDP before slowly receding. There were run-ups during the turmoil of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Great Recession and its financial crisis. For comparison, we added the (much shorter) corresponding series for the United States in red. It’s pretty amazing how well

Topics:
FRED Blog considers the following as important: , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

FRED Blog writes Bank lending standards and loan growth : Monitoring lending activity in troubled times

FRED Blog writes The St. Louis Fed’s Financial Stress Index, Version 2.0

IMFBlog writes In It Together: Protecting the Health of Africa’s People and their Economies

FRED Blog writes Fourth large-scale asset purchases program: A new hope

The British have a history of recording excellent historical data, and we’ve already written a few related posts. Today we look at central bank assets for the Bank of England, founded in 1694. The graph above shows the assets as a share of GDP since 1701, which is a remarkable timeline, especially because it requires estimates of GDP from before the American Revolutionary War not to mention the Battle of Culloden!

This FRED graph shows us that assets in the 18th century reached a fifth of GDP before slowly receding. There were run-ups during the turmoil of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Great Recession and its financial crisis. For comparison, we added the (much shorter) corresponding series for the United States in red. It’s pretty amazing how well they match up.

How this graph was created” Search for “Bank of England assets,” select the appropriate series, and click “Add to Graph.” From the “Edit Graph” panel, open the “Add line” tab, and search for “federal reserve assets.” Once you have the series, change its frequency to quarterly, add a series looking for “nominal GDP,” and apply formula a/b/10. (We multiply by 100 to get percent but divide by 1000 to have the same units for a and b: thus, /10.)

Suggested by Christian Zimmermann.

About FRED Blog
FRED Blog
The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis is the center of the Eighth District of the Federal Reserve System. This District includes Arkansas, eastern Missouri, southern Illinois and Indiana, western Kentucky and Tennessee, and northern Mississippi.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *