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Next Generation of Banknotes: Circulation Date for the New $100 Banknote

Summary:
The Reserve Bank today announced the new 0 banknote will be released into general circulation on 29 October 2020. Existing 0 banknotes retain legal tender status and can continue to be used. The new banknotes have been in production since mid-2019 and will soon be distributed ahead of their release into general circulation. With more than 400 million 0 banknotes in circulation, the release is a big logistical exercise. As with any new banknote it will take time for them to be widely available. The new 0 banknote celebrates the contributions of two outstanding Australians, Sir John Monash and Dame Nellie Melba. Sir John Monash was

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The Reserve Bank today announced the new $100 banknote will be released into general circulation on 29 October 2020. Existing $100 banknotes retain legal tender status and can continue to be used.

The new banknotes have been in production since mid-2019 and will soon be distributed ahead of their release into general circulation. With more than 400 million $100 banknotes in circulation, the release is a big logistical exercise. As with any new banknote it will take time for them to be widely available.

The new $100 banknote celebrates the contributions of two outstanding Australians, Sir John Monash and Dame Nellie Melba. Sir John Monash was an engineer, soldier and civic leader. He was a significant figure in the building-construction industry. Monash is also widely recognised for his service as a commander in the First World War. Dame Nellie Melba was an internationally renowned soprano who performed in Australia, Europe and the United States of America in the late 19th and early 20th century. Melba also made important contributions to the arts through teaching at the Melba Memorial Conservatorium of Music, now the Melba Opera Trust, in her home town of Melbourne.

The Reserve Bank has been working closely with manufacturers of cash-handling machines and businesses that use the machines to prepare for the new banknotes.

New $100 banknotes can be purchased over-the-counter at the Reserve Bank's Sydney Head Office (65 Martin Place) and Canberra branch (20-22 London Circuit). Consistent with current health measures, customers will need to provide contact and collection details in advance of their purchase. For details on purchase and collection arrangements, visit Collecting Banknotes.

Full details of the design and security features on the new $100 banknote, and other denominations, are available on the Bank's website at banknotes.rba.gov.au.

Reserve Bank Australia
The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) came into being on 14 January 1960 as Australia's central bank and banknote issuing authority, when the Reserve Bank Act 1959 removed the central banking functions from the Commonwealth Bank. The bank has the responsibility of providing services to the Government of Australia in addition to also providing services to other central banks and official institutions. It currently consists of the Payments System Board, which governs the payments system policy of the bank, and the Reserve Bank Board, which governs all other monetary and banking policies of the bank.

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