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Home / Tag Archives: Academic research & research papers

Tag Archives: Academic research & research papers

Inclusive American Economic History: Containing Slaves, Freedmen, Jim Crow Laws, and the Great Migration

Fascinating paper by Trevon Logan and Peter Temin: In this paper, we combine white and black economic histories of the United States from its formation to the present. The Constitutional compromises between slave and free states set the stage for rapid economic growth as cotton from Southern slave states provided the raw material for the emerging cotton industry in the North. The cooperation between states also set up tensions that intensified over time as the addition of new states...

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The evolution of monetary policy frameworks in the post-crisis environment

Anna Samarina and Nikos Apokoritis in this voxeu piece: Monetary policy frameworks have evolved since the global crisis. The column investigates the changes for 14 advanced economy central banks. Banks are defining lower, more narrow inflation targets. Transparency and commitment have been enhanced, and the monetary policy toolkit has been expanded. ….. Several conclusions can be drawn about the evolution of monetary policy frameworks after the crisis. First, no central bank has...

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From reforms to stagnation – 20 years of economic policies in Putin’s Russia

Laura Solanko of Bank of Finland in this research note tracks Putin era. This paper gives a concise overview of the economic difficulties and policy responses in Putin’s Russia from the late 1990s to present. The discussion concludes with thoughts on future challenges facing Russia. This entry was posted on January 15, 2020 at 1:55 pm and is filed under Academic research & research papers, Economics - macro, micro etc. You...

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A network analysis of economic history: how economic historians are interconnected through their research

Gregori Galofré Vilà of Universitat Pompeu Fabra in this voxeu piece: Economic history is a thriving subset of the field. This column uses network analysis to review the development of the discipline over the last 40 years. It illustrates how economic historians are interconnected through their research, identifies which scholars are the most cited by their peers, and reveals the central debates enlivening the discipline. It also shows that the rapid increase in the number of economic...

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The origins of microfinance

Marvin Suesse and Nikolaus Wolf in this article: There was a rapid spread of credit cooperatives in rural 19th-century Germany providing small-scale savings and loan services to previously unbanked people. This column shows how these cooperatives helped shift farm investment from grains to potentially profitable but more capital-intensive products, such as the production of meat and dairy. In cases like this, changes in the sector of economic activity are a better metric for the impact...

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Bankers as Immoral? The Parallels between Aquinas’s Views on Usury and Marxian Views of Banking and Credit

Thomas Lambert of University of Louisville in this interesting paper looks at history of thought on banking: Throughout history, the performance, practices and ethics of bankers and banking in general have received mixed reviews in both popular and scholarly writings. Early writings by philosophers, clerics, and scribes played a crucial role in the perceptions of banking and banking occupations. Thomas Aquinas’s thoughts and writings were greatly influenced by the Romans’ and Aristotle’s...

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How does information management and control affect bank stability: Evidence from FDR’s Bank Holiday

Haelim Anderson and Adam Copeland in this NY Fed paper: How does information management and control affect bank stability? Following a national bank holiday in 1933, New York state bank regulators suspended the publication of balance sheets of state-charter banks for two years, whereas the national-charter bank regulator did not. We use this divergence in policies to examine how the suspension of bank-specific information affected depositors. We find that state-charter banks...

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Researching on history of Central Bank of Spain sitting anywhere

The Governor of Central Bank of Spain had earlier announced that it wants to promote research in economic history. To take this further, the central bank has launched a new portal containing the digital collection of the Banco de España’s Library: The Banco de España makes its institutional repository, a new portal containing the Library’s collection in digital format, available to researchers and users in general. When launched, the repository will provide access to 2,182 documents,...

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What makes a safe asset?

Interesting paper by ECB econs: There is growing academic and policy interest in so called “safe assets”, that is assets that have stable nominal payoffs, are highly liquid and carry minimal credit risk. They are particularly valuable during periods of stress in financial markets, as they maintain their nominal value while the value of other assets typically falls. In order to hold such assets, investors are typically willing to pay a premium, often referred to as “convenience yield”, a...

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The 3 E’s of central bank communication with the public

Andrew Haldane, Alistair Macaulay and Michael McMahon in this paper point to 3 Es of central bank communications: In this paper we explore both theoretical and empirical evidence on communication with the general public. The model provides guidance for policymakers by highlighting some potentially important risks in communicating simply with a broader audience. In particular, in a model where trust and engagement are low, there are benefits to engaging a wider audience. But doing so...

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