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Home / Tag Archives: Blogs to Read

Tag Archives: Blogs to Read

Top 100 Economics Blogs & Websites To Follow in 2021

Feedspot has updated its list of top 100 economics blogs and websites for 2021. Humbled to see Mostly Economics blog is on the list for 2021 as well. Thanks a lot to all the readers and well-wishers. This entry was posted on July 7, 2021 at 10:22 am and is filed under Blogs to Read. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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When should policymakers reach for the history books? Some examples from the 20th century

Catherine Schenk in BankUnderground blog: Since the Great Financial Crisis started in 2007 there has been renewed interest in using the past as a basis for policy responses in the present, but how useful is history and how is it best used? Certainly, the old chestnut that ‘those who neglect the past are sure to repeat it’ is a valid warning, but how to select the appropriate historical examples and draw the right lessons is a more nuanced exercise that is explored in this post....

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Quantifying culture and its implications for bank riskiness

Joel Suss, David Bholat, Alex Gillespie and Tom Reader explain their recent paper on the Bank Underground blog. The paper finds a statistically significant relationship between organisational culture and bank risk. The effect is substantive – a one standard deviation improvement in culture is expected to reduce risk by 25%. In sum, a bank’s culture is a leading indicator of its risk. While this claim has often been made, it has been far less frequently substantiated. Our research...

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The Bank of England’s architects and architecture

Alice Beagley, Museum Officer at Bank of England Museum in this post reviews how architects and architecture have shaped Bank of England building. This entry was posted on May 19, 2021 at 1:58 pm and is filed under Blogs to Read, Central Banks / Monetary Policy. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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The policymaker’s fiscal trilemma: increase spending, lower taxes and reduce debt

Abebe Aemro Selassie and Andrew Tiffin of IMF in this new post: Imagine you’re a policymaker in sub-Saharan Africa. You’ve been charged with lifting your country out of the worst health crisis in living memory, and nobody around you knows when it will end—the second wave that gripped the region earlier in the year has eased, but many countries are nonetheless bracing for further waves as winter approaches. One piece of good news is that a global recovery is well underway. Key economies...

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Economist as a Tailor: Creativity in the art of sewing, crafting and recycling

Jeemol Unni, Professor of Economics at Ahmedabad University dons the hat of a tailor with aplomb. Sewing is a hobby I cultivated when I was a child, later as an adolescent and continued as an adult till the present! If sewing is being creative and creativity is in the genes, then I am sure it came to me from the maternal side of my family. My grandmother and my mother enjoyed sewing and taught me various tricks of the trade even as a child. Both of them had sewing machines. My...

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What led colonial states to invest much more in some districts than others?

Prof Joan Ricart-Huguet of Loyola University Maryland in this article tries to answer the colonial question: What led colonial states to invest much more in some districts than others? This study shows that natural harbors and capes led some places to become centers of pre-colonial trade. These areas, in turn, attracted the lion’s share of colonial public investments not only in infrastructure but also in health and education. Public investments were considerably lower in places further...

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Bank of England Museum Blog

Bank of England’s museum started a blog on 19-Feb-2021: Our new blog explores our history and interesting objects from our collections. These informal posts takes you behind the scenes of our museum. First post argued why BoE was formed: Ever wondered what led to our foundation in 1694? Here’s a quick explanation. In short: The Bank was founded because Charles II didn’t repay the debts he owed to goldsmiths. “Hang on a minute,” I hear you say. “Charles II wasn’t even on the throne in...

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Limiting Central Banking

From Moneyandbanking blog Since 2007, and especially over the past year, actions of public officials have blurred the lines between monetary and fiscal policy almost beyond recognition. Central banks have expanded both the scope and scale of their interventions in unprecedented fashion. This fiscalization risks central bank independence, thereby weakening policymakers’ ability to deliver on their mandates for price and financial stability. In our view, to find a way to back to the...

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