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Tag Archives: Denmark

Chart of the WeekHow e-Government Services Can Pay Dividends

By Ali Al-Sadiq The ability to renew your passport or driver’s license, pay a tax bill, or access government data with the click of a button or swipe of a screen, anytime and anywhere, has grown more important during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent the spread of the virus. Beyond the obvious efficiency and transparency gains that digital government services provide, “e-government” can actually make an economy more attractive to foreign investors. Recent IMF staff research has linked―for the...

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Data PointsDenmark’s Ambitious Green Vision

By Nicoletta Batini and Miguel Segoviano Denmark aspires to become one of the most climate-friendly countries in the world. In June, its Parliament overwhelmingly passed a new climate law that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, with net zero emissions targeted for 2050. This is an even more ambitious goal than the EU’s target to cut emissions by 55 percent over the same time period. 70% Amount by which Denmark plans to reduce greenhouse gas...

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Chart of the WeekWaste Woes in the World

By IMFBlog Have you thought about how much garbage you generate every day? Economists have looked at the data and it turns out that higher-income countries like the United States, Denmark, and New Zealand generate at least twice as much waste per capita than developing countries. Our chart of the week from recent research shows which advanced economies generate just how much waste per person. Higher-income people not only consume more goods overall, but they also use up a higher...

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Countries in the IMF Financial Spotlight in 2020

By IMFBlog In 2020, the IMF plans to assess the stability of twelve financial systems. Seven assessments are of jurisdictions with systemically important financial sectors (Austria, Denmark, Hong Kong SAR, Italy, Korea, Norway, and the United States), for which it is mandatory to undergo financial stability assessments every five years. The other five assessments are Algeria, Latvia, Philippines, South Africa, and Trinidad and Tobago, which are being done at the request of those countries...

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Chart of the WeekThe Threat of Inequality of Opportunity

By Shekhar Aiyar and Christian Ebeke There are clashing views on the relationship between income inequality and growth. Some have pointed to at least some measure of inequality as a necessary outcome of the rewards to innovation and risk-taking. Others have argued that excessive income inequality depresses investment in both human and physical capital, two key sources of long-term growth. In recent research we argue that the crucial missing link in the inequality-growth relationship is...

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Cashing In: How to Make Negative Interest Rates Work

By Ruchir Agarwal and Signe Krogstrup Many central banks reduced policy interest rates to zero during the global financial crisis to boost growth. Ten years later, interest rates remain low in most countries. While the global economy has been recovering, future downturns are inevitable. Severe recessions have historically required 3–6 percentage points cut in policy rates. If another crisis happens, few countries would have that kind of room for monetary policy to respond. To get around...

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Countries in the IMF Financial Spotlight in 2019

By IMFBlog In 2019, the IMF will complete 14 assessments under the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP). Eight of this year’s assessments are mandatory: Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Italy, Poland, Singapore, and Switzerland. The other six are voluntary: Algeria, Bahamas, Kuwait, FYR Macedonia, Malta, and Thailand. The FSAP is an in-depth analysis of a country’s financial sector. It serves as the principal tool for assessing countries’ financial stability. The IMF conducts about...

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Chart of the Week: Top 5 Charts

By IMFBlog July 25, 2018 People wait while their electric cars charge, in Xiamen, China (photo: Zhang Guojun/Newscom) Rank has its privileges, the saying goes.  This week our editors pull rank and pick their favorite charts from our Chart of the Week series.  We’ve selected charts on electric cars, China’s thrift, Iceland’s tourism, wealth and inequality, and millennial home ownership as our top choices.  Chart of the Week: Sharing the Wealth: Inequality and Who Owns What Chart of...

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The Decline in Manufacturing Jobs: Not Necessarily a Cause for Concern

By Bertrand Gruss and Natalija Novta April 9, 2018 Version in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese),  Español (Spanish), 日本語 (Japanese), Português  (Portuguese), Русский (Russian) Textile manufacturing plant in Recife, Brazil: in many countries, the share of manufacturing jobs is declining (photo: Ingram Publishing/Newscom). Manufacturing jobs are waning. In many emerging market and developing economies, workers are shifting from agriculture to services, bypassing the manufacturing sector. In...

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Taxes, Debt and Development: A One-Percent Rule to Raise Revenues in Africa

By Vitor Gaspar and Abebe Aemro Selassie December 5, 2017 Versions in Español (Spanish),  Русский (Russian) School children in Ghana: building a country’s tax capacity helps pay for education and health care (photo: Vacca Sintesi/SIPA/Newscom). Tax revenues play a critical role for countries to create room in their budgets to increase spending on social services like health and education, and public investment. At a time when public debt levels in sub-Saharan Africa have increased...

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