Sunday , October 20 2019
Home / Tag Archives: Education

Tag Archives: Education

Is Free College the Solution to Student Debt Woes? Studying the Heterogeneous Impacts of Merit Aid Programs

Rajashri Chakrabarti, William Nober, and Wilbert van der Klaauw The rising cost of a college education has become an important topic of discussion among both policymakers and practitioners. At least eleven states have recently introduced programs to make public two-year education tuition free, including New York, which is rolling out its Excelsior Scholarship to provide tuition-free four-year college education to low-income students across the SUNY and CUNY systems. Prior to these...

Read More »

Introduction to Heterogeneity Series: Understanding Causes and Implications of Various Inequalities

Rajashri Chakrabarti and William Nober Economic analysis is often geared toward understanding the average effects of a given policy or program. Likewise, economic policies frequently target the average person or firm. While averages are undoubtedly useful reference points for researchers and policymakers, they don’t tell the whole story: it is vital to understand how the effects of economic trends and government policies vary across geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic...

Read More »

Back to School Blogs

By IMFBlog Trade wars and inverted yield curves do not typically top the charts of your summer, beach-friendly reading list. But summer in the Northern Hemisphere has disappeared as quickly as your last strawberry daquiri, right along with your ability to remember your computer password.  Trade wars and inverted yield curves do not typically top the charts of your summer reading list. Need a hand shifting gears?  We have put together a primer of our recent blogs, each a quick read, on...

Read More »

chart of the weekFuel for Thought: Ditch the Subsidies

By IMFBlog Pensions, education, healthcare, better infrastructure, technology, and climate change: fiscal policymakers have their work cut out for them on many fronts.  Whether you live in a rapidly aging advanced economy,  or a low-income or emerging market economy with a young, booming population, all these issues matter for you.  As the Fiscal Monitor in April 2019 shows, government policies on taxes and spending have to adapt and should shift to growth-enhancing investment.  This means,...

Read More »

Did the Value of a College Degree Decline during the Great Recession?

Rajashri Chakrabarti, Michelle Jiang, and William Nober In an earlier post, we studied how educational attainment affects labor market outcomes and earnings inequality. In this post, we investigate whether these labor market effects were preserved across the last business cycle: Did students with certain types of educational attainment weather the recession better? Focusing on students’ labor market outcomes during 2003-14 (a period that spans both a boom and a bust), we hope...

Read More »

Chart of the WeekGrowing Through Education in Nigeria

By Vivian Malta and Monique Newiak Our chart of the week, drawn from the IMF’s 2019 economic health check for Nigeria, highlights substantial inequality in access to education between girls and boys, and between rich and poor. It is widely accepted that addressing educational gaps results in rapid and large benefits for children, their families, communities, and the country more broadly.   Limited schooling for girls According to a survey conducted by the Nigeria Bureau of...

Read More »

Despite Rising Costs, College Is Still a Good Investment

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz Second of two posts In our last post, we showed that the cost of college has increased sharply in recent years due to the rising opportunity cost of attending school and the steady rise in tuition. This steep increase in the cost of college has once again raised questions about whether college is “worth it.” In this post, we weigh the economic benefits of a bachelor’s degree against the costs to estimate the return to college, providing an update...

Read More »

The Cost of College Continues to Climb

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz First of two posts College is much more expensive than it used to be. Tuition for a bachelor’s degree has more than tripled from an (inflation-adjusted) average of about $5,000 per year in the 1970s to around $18,000 today. For many parents and prospective students, this high and rising tuition has raised concerns about whether getting a college degree is still worth it—a question we addressed in a 2014 study. In this post, we update that...

Read More »

Tackling Income Inequality Requires New Policies

By IMFBlog Español, Português The hollowing out of the middle class, rising social and political tension, lack of education, globalization, and rapid technological change are just a few of the many drivers of growing income inequality. “Inclusive growth is one of the critical challenges of our time,” IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said at a recent event on income inequality at the IMF Spring Meetings. “The bitter-sweet reality is that despite economic growth there are...

Read More »

Financing for Sustainable Development: Tackling Big Challenges

By Chris Lane Français (French) Without adequate financing, the best intentions of the global community expressed in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will remain beyond reach. Recent setbacks in financing for development should therefore focus policymakers’ attention on the need for decisive national strategies so these best intentions might be realized. Harnessing the necessary resources could be achieved through a combination of revenue mobilization, attracting private finance,...

Read More »