Friday , July 30 2021
Home / Tag Archives: Financial Intermediation

Tag Archives: Financial Intermediation

Tailoring Regulations

Rebecca Reubenstein and Asani Sarkar Regulations are not written in stone. The benefits derived from them, along with the costs of compliance for affected institutions and of enforcement for regulators, are likely to evolve. When this happens, regulators may seek to modify the regulations to better suit the specific risk profiles of regulated entities. In this post, we consider the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (EGRRCPA) passed by Congress in 2018,...

Read More »

Hold the Check: Overdrafts, Fee Caps, and Financial Inclusion

Jennifer Dlugosz, Brian Melzer, and Donald P. Morgan Editor’s Note: Our series continues tomorrow with an examination of “Credit, Income, and Inequality.” The 25 percent of low-income Americans without a checking account operate in a separate but unequal financial world. Instead of paying for things with cheap, convenient debit cards and checks, they get by with “fringe” payment providers like check cashers, money transfer, and other alternatives. Costly overdrafts rank high...

Read More »

Hold the Check: Overdrafts, Fee Caps, and Financial Inclusion

Jennifer Dlugosz, Brian Melzer, and Donald P. Morgan The 25 percent of low-income Americans without a checking account operate in a separate but unequal financial world. Instead of paying for things with cheap, convenient debit cards and checks, they get by with “fringe” payment providers like check cashers, money transfer, and other alternatives. Costly overdrafts rank high among reasons why households “bounce out” of the banking system and some observers have advocated capping...

Read More »

Banking the Unbanked: The Past and Future of the Free Checking Account

Stein Berre, Kristian Blickle, and Rajashri Chakrabarti About one in twenty American households are unbanked (meaning they do not have a demand deposit or checking account) and many more are underbanked (meaning they do not have the range of bank-provided financial services they need). Unbanked and underbanked households are more likely to be lower-income households and households of color. Inadequate access to financial services pushes the unbanked to use high-cost alternatives for...

Read More »

Banking the Unbanked: The Past and Future of the Free Checking Account

Stein Berre, Kristian Blickle, and Rajashri Chakrabarti About one in twenty American households are unbanked (meaning they do not have a demand deposit or checking account) and many more are underbanked (meaning they do not have the range of bank-provided financial services they need). Unbanked and underbanked households are more likely to be lower-income households and households of color. Inadequate access to financial services pushes the unbanked to use high-cost alternatives for...

Read More »

Sophisticated and Unsophisticated Runs

Marco Cipriani and Gabriele La Spada In March 2020, U.S. prime money market funds (MMFs) suffered heavy outflows following the liquidity shock triggered by the COVID-19 crisis. In a previous post, we characterized the run on the prime MMF industry as a whole and the role of the liquidity facility established by the Federal Reserve (the Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility) in stemming the run. In this post, based on a recent Staff Report, we contrast the behaviors of retail...

Read More »

Sophisticated and Unsophisticated Runs

Marco Cipriani and Gabriele La Spada In March 2020, U.S. prime money market funds (MMFs) suffered heavy outflows following the liquidity shock triggered by the COVID-19 crisis. In a previous post, we characterized the run on the prime MMF industry as a whole and the role of the liquidity facility established by the Federal Reserve (the Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility) in stemming the run. In this post, based on a recent Staff Report, we contrast the behaviors of retail and...

Read More »

Up on Main Street

Donald P. Morgan and Steph Clampitt The Main Street Lending Program was the last of the facilities launched by the Fed and Treasury to support the flow of credit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The others primarily targeted Wall Street borrowers; Main Street was for smaller firms that rely more on banks for credit. It was a complicated program that worked by purchasing loans and sharing risk with lenders. Despite its delayed launch, Main Street purchased more debt than any other...

Read More »

Up on Main Street

Donald P. Morgan and Steph Clampitt The Main Street Lending Program was the last of the facilities launched by the Fed and Treasury to support the flow of credit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The others primarily targeted Wall Street borrowers; Main Street was for smaller firms that rely more on banks for credit. It was a complicated program that worked by purchasing loans and sharing risk with lenders. Despite its delayed launch, Main Street purchased more debt than any other facility and...

Read More »

How Does Zombie Credit Affect Inflation? Lessons from Europe

Viral V. Acharya, Matteo Crosignani, Tim Eisert, and Christian Eufinger Even after the unprecedented stimulus by central banks in Europe following the global financial crisis, Europe’s economic growth and inflation have remained depressed, consistently undershooting projections. In a striking resemblance to Japan’s “lost decades,” the European economy has been recently characterized by persistently low interest rates and the provision of cheap bank credit to impaired firms, or...

Read More »