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Tag Archives: South Africa

Economies in the Financial Spotlight in 2021

By IMFBlog Throughout 2020 and into 2021, the global financial system withstood the effects of the global pandemic and economic lockdowns due to unprecedented policy support. Strong financial systems that are well regulated and well supervised help maintain financial stability. But like a well calibrated engine on a car, maintenance is key. Each year the IMF takes a look under the hood of select economies, which helps to unmask vulnerabilities that could present bigger problems down the...

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COVID-19 Response in Emerging Market Economies: Conventional Policies and Beyond

By Martin Mühleisen, Tryggvi Gudmundsson, and Hélène Poirson Ward Español, Português The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emerging market economies far exceeded that of the global financial crisis. Unlike previous crises, the response has been decisive just like in advanced economies. Yet, conventional policies are reaching their limit and unorthodox policies are not without risks. A pandemic still unfolding COVID-19 is still to play out fully in the emerging market universe (see...

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Chart of the WeekSouth Africa: Bridging the Income Divide

By IMFBlog South Africa suffers among the highest levels of inequality in the world. As our Chart of the Week shows, the country’s wealth is concentrated in the upper levels of society. The top 20 percent of the population holds over 68 percent of income, while the poorest 40 percent possess only 7 percent of income. That inequality isn’t only seen in income distribution; it also manifests itself in unequal access to opportunities—education, health, and jobs—and regional disparities....

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Countries in the IMF Financial Spotlight in 2020

By IMFBlog In 2020, the IMF plans to assess the stability of twelve financial systems. Seven assessments are of jurisdictions with systemically important financial sectors (Austria, Denmark, Hong Kong SAR, Italy, Korea, Norway, and the United States), for which it is mandatory to undergo financial stability assessments every five years. The other five assessments are Algeria, Latvia, Philippines, South Africa, and Trinidad and Tobago, which are being done at the request of those countries...

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Chart of the WeekThe Threat of Inequality of Opportunity

By Shekhar Aiyar and Christian Ebeke There are clashing views on the relationship between income inequality and growth. Some have pointed to at least some measure of inequality as a necessary outcome of the rewards to innovation and risk-taking. Others have argued that excessive income inequality depresses investment in both human and physical capital, two key sources of long-term growth. In recent research we argue that the crucial missing link in the inequality-growth relationship is...

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Sluggish Global Growth Calls for Supportive Policies

By Gita Gopinath عربي, 中文, Español, Français, 日本語, Português, Русский In our July update of the World Economic Outlook we are revising downward our projection for global growth to 3.2 percent in 2019 and 3.5 percent in 2020. While this is a modest revision of 0.1 percentage points for both years relative to our projections in April, it comes on top of previous significant downward revisions. The revision for 2019 reflects negative surprises for growth in emerging market and developing...

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Tariff Shocks: The Role of Value Chains in Europe

By Raju Huidrom, Carlos Mulas-Granados, Laura Papi, and Emil Stavrev (Español, Português) The Czech Republic exports only a small number of cars and car parts directly to the United States, but it’s likely to suffer significant economic damage if that country were to impose tariffs on auto imports. The reason: the Czech Republic supplies parts that are used to build cars exported by other European countries. Europe’s auto industry is one of many that are part of global value chains, in...

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A Global Picture of Public Wealth

By Jason Harris, Abdelhak Senhadji, and Alexander F. Tieman Español, Português Our new data on government assets shows that when governments know what they own, they can make better use of the assets for the well-being of all their citizens.  We make these data free and publicly available for all to use because we believe transparency can help create better public policy.  The chart shows that advanced economies have larger balance sheets compared to emerging markets and low-income...

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How to Help, Not Hinder Global Growth

By Christine Lagarde As the G-20 finance ministers and central bank governors gather this week in Fukuoka, they can take inspiration from their host city. Known as Japan’s “startup city,” Fukuoka has flourished in recent decades by embracing trade, innovation, and openness. That spirit is needed more than ever to help reduce trade tensions and clear other stumbling blocks on the way back to higher and more sustainable growth. The goal must be to help, not stand in the way of global growth....

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Designing Labor Policies to Foster Inclusive Growth in Emerging Markets

By Romain Duval and Prakash Loungani Emerging market economies have enjoyed good growth in recent decades but are still far from closing gaps in living standards with advanced economies. Emerging markets also need growth to be shared by everyone, particularly by providing their growing populations with good jobs and social protection. In a new IMF staff paper, we look at how the design of labor markets—institutions and policies—could foster inclusive growth in these countries.    ...

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